About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
WETA 43
LANGUAGE
English 43
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)
've been forgotten. >> this is new york city, the financial capital of the world. putting right what's happened here is going to take many months and maybe longer. >> and getting ready for new leaders in china. tonight we continue our series of special reports on the challenges they'll face. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. with just four days to go before the u.s. presidential election, a new jobs report is fueling arguments on the campaign trail. it seems to have something for everyone. president obama is time-outing that more jobs were -- touting that more jobs have been created than were expected. romney says the overall elm ploit rate is actually up. now starts the weekend blitz and the bbc's adam brooks has been watching the reaction for us. >> the voter in the state of ohio -- >> in 2008 we were in the middle of two wars and the worst economic crisis since the great depression. today our businesses have created nearly 5 1/2 million new jobs and this morning we learned the companies hired more workers in october than at any ti
commute since the storm hit a week ago. it taxed transit systems to the limit in new york city, connecticut and parts of new jersey >> we keep missing trains because it's so packed you can't enter the trains >> reporter: lines stretched for blocks as thousands of people tried to get to work. trains from new jersey to new york remained out, but key subway lines connecting manhattan to brooklyn under the east river were open. and the statten island ferry was running. >> i don't think it's really normal for anyone right now. we have so much on our minds right now especially for those who have family that lost everything, you know. not normal yet. >> reporter: the trarns it challenges came on top of a cold night for thousands of people still without power with temperatures dropping into the 30s. >> we have hot soup, hot chocolate, blank hes, cleaning supplies >> reporter: some 1.4 million homes and businesses across seven states still were in the dark. well more than 700,000 of those were in new jersey where governor chris christie visited with victims and volunteers today. >> ther
hit areas of new york city, new jersey, and long island are up and running. for those who do get gas, they'll pay more for it. gasoline prices in the northeast have increased as much as 14 cents a gallon. >> tom: 1.3 million people are still without power tonight, one week after superstorm sandy. and as susie mentioned, temperatures are plummeting, as another storm approaches the northeast. having no power and no heat is one concern. but thousands of people have also been left homeless by the storm, and that is fueling worries about a housing shortage. erika miller reports. >> reporter: the new york city metropolitan area is slowly recovering after superstorm sandy. but many homes and businesses still don't have power, or heat. >> things that took months or years to build are gone, how quickly we can get it back i'm not sure, but there will certainly be places that don't have power for a very long time. >> reporter: lack of power is more than just an inconvenience, it's also safety issue. temperatures have started hitting the low 30's, and a nor'easter is forecast later this week. so
are paralyzing much of new jersey and new york city here's an update: four and a half million people are still without power, and it could take another ten days before power is restored. limited flights have resumed at all of the airports in the new york area. public schools are still closed in the city, as well as many schools in new jersey. and filling up on gas is the toughest problem of all. gas stations are running dry, and others do not have electricity to pump gas. motorists lined by the hundreds in new jersey, waiting and hoping for fuel. still ahead, we have more on sandy: flood insurance, the cost of getting power turned back on, and the challenge of getting around america's busiest city. >> tom: october marked a pick-up in private hiring. that's the word from payroll processing firm adp. it says u.s. private payrolls grew by 158,000 positions in october. that higher than expected number comes as adp overhauls how it calculates the number by including more companies in its survey. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: the economic signals out today point in the same direction-- an econo
in the northeast and controversy nixes sunday's running of the new york city marathon. that and more tonight on "n.b.r.!" we begin with jobs. employers beefed up their payrolls last month, adding more jobs than expected as more americans counted themselves among the labor force. the official labor department count shows 171,000 jobs were created last month. that's much stronger than the 125,000 analysts were looking for. and the government revised its september new job count up to 148,000. thanks to more people looking for work, the unemployment rate rose slightly to 7.9%. darren gersh has the story from washington d.c. >> reporter: the october employment report makes it clear a jobs recovery is solidly underway. >> i think the key message there is that employment growth has been taken up a notch. over the last three months we've added over 170,000 jobs on average. that's a little bit better than what we've been seeing. that is enough over the long haul to bring the unemployment rate down, but slowly. >> reporter: one of the best things about this jobs report: payroll gains were broad-based. retai
, we have had incredible support from volunteers. to the north, in hoboken, across from new york city, emergency and national guard trucks moved through the flooded streets overnight. when "sandy" hit, the storm surge on the hudson river swamped a quarter of the city, leaving 20,000 people stranded in their homes and in the dark. >> it's really scary. we don't have that much food. we prepared a little bit. >> reporter: for others across new jersey, the loss of electricity meant no way to pump gas, which led to long lines at places where fuel was available. >> an hour and 40 minutes almost. crazy. i'm out of gas though, i have less than a quarter tank, so i had to get out today. >> brown: and financial help was >> there's nothing more precious to people than their homes. homes are where their families are, memories and possessions of their lives and there's also a sense of safety to home. you feel like when you get in that place and you close that door that there's a sense of safety there. that sense of safety was violated on monday. with water rushing into people's homes at an enormou
of the gas situation. >> suarez: frustration was also at a boil on new york city's staten island, where local officials complained they've been largely ignored since monday's storm. >> this is america, not a third world nation. we need food, we need clothing. >> suarez: another fight was brewing over running the new york city marathon sunday morning beginning on staten island. new york city mayor michael bloomberg defended the decision. >> it doesn't use resources that can really make a difference in recovery and that sort of thing. it's a different group of people. we have to work around the clock for people to get through this thing, and i assure you we're doing that. if i thought it took any resources away from that we would, we would not do this. >> bloomberg reversed course and announced the marathon was canceled. further adding to the frustration of many, the power was still off for well over three million customers, many of them in new york and new jersey. this man lives in far rockaway, in queens. >> we are not sitting around here singing "kumbaya." this is really a dangerous, dangero
hurricane sandy battered the region. police cars in new york city patrolled low-lying neighborhoods, urging people to evacuate again. the approaching nor'easter brought a wintry mix of cold and snow and possibly, minor flooding in already damaged coastal areas. new york mayor michael bloomberg: >> we haven't and won't order the kind of large scale evacuation we ordered in advance of hurricane sandy but if you are experiencing significant flooding during sandy you should consider taking shelter with friends and family at a safer spot or using one of the city's storm center shelters. >> sreenivasan: in new jersey, thousands of storm-weary people braced for their brush with the new storm, even as cleanup efforts continued from "sandy". governor chris christie suggested it was a little like the biblical plagues. >> when i finally got that final kind of, forecast that i got last night, i said i'm waiting for the locusts and pestilence next, you know. >> sreenivasan: the storm could also bring wind gusts of 65 miles an hour-- bedeviling efforts to restore power to more than 600,000 customers stil
since "sandy" hit. today, new york city mayor michael bloomberg ordered gas rationing into effect. the gunman in last year's arizona shooting rampage was sentenced today to life in prison without parole. jared lee loughner killed six people and wounded 13, including congresswoman gabrielle giffords. she later resigned to focus on her recovery. several victims, including giffords, were in federal court today in tucson. her husband, astronaut mark kelly, told loughner, "you may have put a bullet through her head, but you haven't put a dent in her spirit." afterward, the u.s. attorney for arizona spoke to reporters. >> it is our hope that the final resolution of this case will be a positive step towards their healing process, physically, emotionally, and psychologically. it was with them in mind that we entered into this plea agreement with the defendant. >> sreenivasan: loughner pleaded guilty, thereby avoiding the death penalty. a warplane from iran fired on an american drone over the persian gulf last week, but the drone escaped unharmed. a pentagon spokesman confirmed the inciden
our infrastructure, our built environment. >> rose: new york city mayor michael bloomberg began and ended his briefing at city hall with words to those who lost hay loved one in the hurricane. new yorkers everywhere joined him extending their thoughts to the victims of disaster. >> everyone here hearts go out to the families of those who lost family in the storm and those who lost their homes. our thoughts and prayers are with everyone and we certainly will give our full support in the next weeks and months to those hurt by the storm. >> rose: we turn to an interview we taped earlier this week with the actor denzel washington. and director bob zemeckis. >> it all comes down to the script for me. when i read a screen play that i can't put down, and when i read a screen play that's unique and really well written and complex, i feel it's worthy to do. and then i heard that denzel was interested in doing it, and when iwhen i read the screen play it was like he was perfect for the part. so i called him up and said, are you really interested in this?" and he said, "year, i am." >> num
new york city youth -- losing huge parts of its infrastructure, losing electrical service, losing subways because they were flooded. it is not just a matter of trying to prepare in the sense of being able to respond to the storm, but thinking about how we build cities and electrical grids that are more resilient in extreme weather events like sandy. >> is there a chance that an event like this or the prospect of multiple events like this, because as we have heard from the governor of new york, these things are writing more and more frequently, will actually be the catalyst that forces the country and politicians to take leadership and do what is needed on critical issues like infrastructure, like climate change? >> if anything is going to do it, i think it will be programs like this one. the united states, like a lot of countries, can be very short term in its leadership and thinking. we tend to be disaster driven and follow what ever happened last. this should give us an image is to deal with this problem, but at the same time, we had hurricane katrina seven years ago. we had the
worldwide. from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: once every ten years china changes its government, they do it the party congress in beijing, xi jinping was named president and chairman he succeeds huh engine too and chose six people who will run china, the six members of the standing committee of the politburo, many questions about china and the new leadership one is about the growth of the economy and others is about the tension in the country between urban and rural, conservative and liberal, many are concerned about the demographics of china, others are worried about the conflict with japan and always there is a question of the relationship between china and the united states. we talk about all of those questions this evening with ian bremmer, he is the president and founder of the eurasia group from washington, richard mcgregor of the financial times, the author of the party and jim fallows of the atlantic, his book china airborne came out earlier
there is enough for everyone. >>> president obama this week toured areas in new york city still grappling with the aftermath of hurricane sandy. the president met with first responders and victims. faith-based relief groups continue to help with the clean-up. the relief arm of the southern baptist convention says it will provide meals through december. and islamic relief usa announced it will partner with the church of jesus christ of latter day saints, the mormons, to deliver supplies to heavily hit parts of new york and new jersey. >>> there were sharp words exchanged between china and the dalai lama as the number of self-immolations by tibetans grew dramatically. speaking in japan, the dalai lama called for an investigation into the causes behind the immolations and faulted china for seeing buddhism as a threat. china meanwhile once again accused the dalia lama of glorifying the suicides. at least ten tibetans inside china set themselves on fire in the last two weeks to protest china's policy on tibet. >>> we have a special commemoration today of what many say is the world's greatest w
." >> they went to a acapulco, new york city, that when first class. but this spring, somewhere along the way, -- >> all i want is for you to be a man for one thing you are life. -- for once in your life. >> there are people in town that would have shot her for $5. >> the nicest fellowver met. >> he didn't do it. >> an angel of death. tavis: when i first saw this, i cannot believe this was actually based on a true story. >> yes, true story. tavis: where do you find the humor in a story where a guy kills his wife? >> it is not a traditional comedy, because it is based on a true story. there is a real murder here. that is a very serious subject, so you don't want to make a mockery of the situation. you want to play it real, but there are some very peculiar things about this particular case. he is the most popular guy in this small texas town. everybody loves him. he is the least likely to be a convicted murderer. not only does he murder, but he hides the body in an ice locker and just goes about his daily business as if nothing has happened, for nine months, before anyone even asks where is mar
in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> this has been a difficult week for the city of new york four days after hurricane sandy made landfall life has not yet returned to normal. gas shortages, power outages and disruptions of mass transit stand in the way of a full recovery. joining me now is ray kelly, new york city police commissioner. his force has been at the front line of rescue and relief efforts. the police department is working overtime in all areas of the city. not only to detect criminal behavior but also to be engaged with all the people who are part of the response to this tragedy. i'm pleased to have ray kelly back on this program. welcome. >> good to be with you, charlie. >> rose: we taped this at 5:00 on this day. you just got a phone call about the marathon. >> yerk the mayor has decided to cancel the marathon. the marathon has always been a unifying force in the city. and he didn't want it to be something that resulted in division or divisiveness. so he's decided that the marathon shouldn't go forward but that the sponsors, he's asked the sponsors to do this and the
of mexico when we continue. re captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: it has been three days since hurricane sandy made land fall on the eastern coast of the united states. signs of recovery are beginning to appear. residents of storm hit areas are still coming to grips with the scale of the damage. neighborhoods in new york and new jersey remain under water while energy companies work to repair downed power line millions suspect another night without electricity. it may be over a week before power is restored in some places. as dawn broke this morning parts of the subway heaved into motion for the first time since sunday night. commuters eager to return to work with restrictions to auto transport. few in the northeast have not felt the effects of hurricane sand y. experts estimate the disaster will cost up to $50 billion but none forgot i that the true cost of the hurricane lies in the lost of human life. as we learn more about the events of this week some question about greater preparedness could have helped avert tra
jersey still were in the dark. new york city mayor michael bloomberg warned again the process of restoration and recovery will be slow. . a lot of residents unfortunately will be out of power for a long time. but rather than complain about it or even write about it, we're trying to do something about it. we can sit around and bring or hands and say it's terrible. mother nature brought us this storm. now we're just going to deal with it. we're going to go methodically street by street building by building and help people get going. we're going to do the most important life-threatening things first. and then we'll come back. we're not going to stop until everybody is back. >> holman: there also were more signs of progress today, as gasoline rationing ended in central and northern new jersey. rationing continues in new york city. wall street slid again today, amid concerns about impending spending cuts and tax increases in washington. the dow jones industrial average lost nearly 59 points to close at 12,756. the nasdaq fell 20 points to close below 2884. those are some of the day
obama saw first-hand some of the worst damage in new york city today. he toured through several hard- hit areas and met with residents in line for aid at an emergency center. the president said federal help will be available to people for as long as it's needed. >> there's going to be some long term rebuilding required. you look at this block and you know that this is a community that is deeply rooted. most of the folks i met here have been here 20,30, 50 years. they don't want to see their community uprooted but there's got to be a plan for rebuilding. and that plan is going to have to be coordinated and it's going to need resources. >> suarez: another one of the neighborhoods that was on the president's radar today was in new york city, and it faces a long road back. it's also a place where volunteers are playing an increasingly important role in assisting residents. as we learned with the he of producer jonathan silvers inewe york. >> reporter: a new citizens group has risen from the ruins of hurricane sandy on the streets of brooklyn, queens and long island. it's called occupy sa
. >> reporter: in new york city, sabrina norrie and kelli space have an idea of their own, called zero bound. if students are struggling to pay debt in dollars, why not pay it through community service? they're still raising money, but once it's up and running, the company will help borrowers get donations in exchange for volunteer work. >> i thought, there's got to be a way we can get creative about this. and being involved in volunteer work, i thought, lets see if we can invest that education of students and alumni back into the community through volunteering. >> reporter: innovations like these have the support of the federal government, in a report last month, the consumer financial protection bureau said if they work, private businesses could play an important role in helping student borrowers pay down their debts. sylvia hall, "n.b.r.," washington. >> susie: for many people the holidays are typically a time to make charitable contributions. americans gave $200 billion to non-profits last year, and half of that came from the wealthiest americans. what influences their giving? ruben rami
to columbia university in new york city. >> one day he told me he was transferring to columbia. he had, i think, a need for a more expansive environment, more stimulating urban environment to grow intellectually. so that was his choice. >> he needed to actually physically leave and fly across the country and start again at this much more rigorous school to be barack obama, the promising young scholar intellectual that would grow up to be president. >> narrator: barack obama came east to engage the world, especially the black world. he started by moving to the edge of harlem. >> if we wanted things to be harder for ourselves, we succeeded wonderfully. it was kind of a gritty neighborhood. the apartment next door to us on the third floor was burned out and stayed that way the whole time that we lived there. we had, like, five locks on the door, including one of those bars that you put in after you've gone inside the apartment. >> narrator: a couple of friends from the oxy days joined him. >> i think it was complete intimidation by new york city, which seemed rougher and tougher and uncivili
quarter in new york city. she married tom foley, her high school sweetheart, and began her life as a marine wife. nine years later, their daughter kathleen was born. life was good. but then, after 54 years of marriage, tom got sick. >> my husband died of lung cancer. and he went through chemo and radiation, and then more chemo and then more radiation. and he was sick and miserable frequently, if not most of that time. but because i saw how he suffered, i made up my mind, i... when it was my turn, i was going to make sure that i don't go that way. >> narrator: in 2006, joan got remarried to art butterstein, a 86-year-old widower. then, two years later, she found out that she too had lung cancer. >> i told them immediately. i said, "i have no intention of going through all the chemo. not at my age, and not with what i know is already wrong with my body. it's not going to make me have a lovely old life." all right, what about this? 34 down. >> "words seen in brackets." >> s-i-c, sic. >> a few months ago, she went to the doctor, and doctor said, "i think it might be time to sign up
-up call and right now in new york city, the debate is over how much to increase fares in public transit and they -- the metrotransity authority wants to increase the price of riding a subway and the price of riding trains quite a bit, and so how does this make sense? we're supposedly having a wake-up call and we're making it harder for people to use public transit and that's because we don't have the resources that we need. >> you've been out on the devastation, why? >> i'm writing a book and the documentary to go with it and we were filming in the rockaways in staten island and in red hook, and also in the relief hubs where you just see a tremendous number of volunteers organized by occupy wall street. they call it occupy sandy. >> really? >> what i found is that the generosity is tremendous. i saw a friend last night and i asked her whether she'd been involved in the hurricane relief. they have my car, i hope they get it back. if you see it, tell me. people are tremendous. so one of the things that you find out in a disaster is you really do need a public sector. it's really important
. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> i'm al hunt of "bloomberg news" filling in for charlie rose from washington. we quinn if th evening with news from the white house. president obama heldaise first press conference since his reelection. he delivered a brief opening statement, emphasizing the need to avert the fiscal cliff set to take effect january 1. >> there's only one way to solve these humans and that is to do it together. as i've said before, i'm open to compromise and i'm open to new ideas and i've been encouraged the past week to hear republican after republican to agree on the need from more revenue from the wealthiest american as parent of our arithmetic if we're serious about reducing the deficit. >> the president fielded questions. the budget was the most pressing subject. obama vowed not tho extend the bush tax cuts for the top 2% of income earners. >> when it comes to the top 2%, what i'm not going to do is to extend further a tax cut for folks who don't need it, which would cost close to $1 trillion, and it
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: "you are good for nothing unless you are clever," dr. austin sloper declares in henry james' 1880 novel, "washington square." the book tells the story of his daughter, the shy, awkward catherine sloper, whom he views as hopelessly unattractive and not at all clever. when the handsome morris townshend descends on their home and declares his love for catherine, a transformation begins. "the heiress," a theatrical adaptation of james' novel, made its broadway debut in 1947. it has been staged on the great white way every other decade since. a new production starring jessica chastain, david straithairn, and dan stevens recently opened at the walter kerr theatre. here's a look. >> it is a great wonder for me that morris should come into my life. i never thought i would meet a man who would understand me as he does. >> you underestimate your many qualities, my dear. i have always hoped that you would meet a fine young man who would match your goodness with his own. >> and here i have found the goodness, and with it, everyt
. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: when david o. russell first read matthew quick's novel "silver linings play book" it grabed him immediately. he was fascinated by the story of a troubled young man who struggles to rebuild his life after being released from a psychiatric institution. the book is now awe a movie starring bradley cooper, robert de niro and jennifer lawrence. here's a look at the trailer. >> let me break it down for you. the whole time you're rooting for this hemingway guy to survive the war and be with the woman he loves. >> it's 4:00 in the morning. >> can't somebody say hey, let's have a good ending to the story. i can't apologize. you know what i will do? i'll apologize on bealf of earnest hemingway, that's who to blame here. >> have hemingway call us and apologize to us, too. >> i'm getting fit for nicky. >> patrick, she left, she's gone. >> doc, i have one instinct. i come home from work, i see my wife in the shower, i pull the car pain back -- so, yeah, i snapped. >> hey, tiffany, it's pat, you l
by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> the president thinks highly of general alan and his service to his country as well as the job he has done in afghanistan. at the request of the secretary of defense, the president has put on hold general allen numb naig as a supreme allied commander of europe pending the investigation of mr. alan's conduct. the president remains fully supporting our troops and partners in afghanistan who general allen continues to lead as he has done so ably over the year. the president was certainly surprised when he was informed about the situation regarding general petraeus on thursday. he greatly appreciates general petraeus' remarkable service to his country both in uniform and at the cia. as he said in his statement, his heart, his thoughts and prayers go out to both general petraeus and holly petraeus at this time. he's focused on his policy agenda. and he has confidence in the acting director at the cia and he has confidence in the military to carry out the various missions he has asked them to carry out. >> rose
in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: president obama has been reelected as president of the united states. the last few ballots are still being counted, but winning ohio gave the president enough electoral college votes for victory. governor romney, the former governor of massachusetts, conceded just after 1:00 a.m. >> and i ran for office because i'm concerned about america. this election is over but our principles endure. that i believe the principles upon which this nation was founded are the only sure guide to a resurgent economy and to renewed greatness. like so many of you, paul and i have left everything on the field. we have given all our to this campaign. (cheers and applause) i so wish -- i so wish that i had been able to fulfill your hopes to lead the country in a different direction. but the nation chose another leader so ann and i join with you to earnestly pray for him and for this great nation. >> rose: the race revealed america's shifting fault lines. it was a national conversation carried out in a few battleground states. billions of dollars poured in
: an election preview when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: tonight we enter the final hours of 2012's presidential election. tuesday may be the main event but tens of millions have already voted. reduction of early voting hours in key states have raised questions about the propriety of campaign tactics. both sides are preparing for possible legal challenges in a sign that the contest might continue beyond election day. president barack obama and governor romney have spent the day drumming up last-minute support in battleground states. >> you may be frustrated at the pace of change. i promise you, so am i sometimes. but you know that i say what i mean and i mean what i say. (cheers and applause) i said i'd tend war in iraq and i ended it. i said i'd pass health care reform. i passed it. (cheers and applause) i said i'd repeal "don't ask, don't tell." we repealed it. (cheers and applause) i said we'd crack down on reckless practices on wall street and we did. (applause) so you know where i stand. you know wh
by the following: qkfcfv captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. dns-- jeff bezos is here, the c.e.o. of amazon.com. he founded the company in 1994 out of his garage as an on-line bookseller. today it is a 100 billion dollar empire and the world's largest e-commerce retailer. this week fortune named him as 2012 businessperson of the year. the magazine writes that he is the ultimate disrupter. bezos has upended the book industry and displaced electronic merchants. now amazon is pushing into everything from couture retailing and feet film productions to i pad worthy manufacturing. i'm pleased to have him back at this table. welcome and congratulation this very nice. >> thanks, charlry, it is great to be here. >> rose: tell me where amazon is and where it's going. >> well, you know, we've been at it for 18 years now. and the happiest thing i can tell su we're still having fun. so it is a big team of people working hard. we have an unusual business approach in some ways. we're not competitor-obsessed, we're customer obsessed. we
. but in-- there's no way we can live here-- in the house at this time now.ai >> back in new york city, mayor bloomberg warned even mild flooding from the approaching storm could prove greater dangers than normal. >> places that didn't before have a problem with two and a half to four and a half-feet surge might very well this time. >> meanwhile, shortages of gasoline continue. although, officials said they were gradually easing. >> woodruff: that was was of harry srveensan. the we have the latest sign of a housing recovery. the increase was the largest since july 2006. and election day found wall streetnia smood to buy. >> in iraq, 33 people died in a suicide car bombing north of baghdad. nearly 60 others were wounded. the attacker blew up his vehicle near an iraqi military base. most of the victims were iraqi soldiers. there was no immediate claim of responsibility. and the classical composer and pulitzer prize winner elliot carter died on monday at his home in new york city. carter was known for his rhythmically complicated works using american and european modernist traditions. the
where there's an eupbt kuwaited system. new york has 11,000 state agencies, for example. iowa had 99 counties, 35 miles apart, everyone was a separate auditor and clerk of courts and everything else municipalities are reaching out and shutting down local agencies and bringing in private enterprise and working out a compact with them to make it more efficient to free up revenue and to give people hope the system can be k work for them. so that's one of the ways we need to nurture our leaders. i think we've been drawing from the same well for too long in terms of the people who are in washington. >> david brooks, is this a center right country or a center left country? >> i think demonstrably a center right country. just do the polling. the pew research center asked people where are you on a scale from 0 to 5, 0 being conservative, 5 being liberal. they're about a 2/3 or 2/2. so they see themselves as center right. they're suspicious of government but they think government should give them a helping hand with pell grants. if i could give advice to the republican party assuming they're
's still an antiquated system. new york has 11,000 state agencies, for example. iowa had 99 down trees, 35 miles apart. everyone with a separate sheriff and auditor and everything else. at the tertiary level people are coming to grips with the problems and a lot of that has to do with public private. not just mitch daniels in indiana. municipalities are meecham of reaching out and shutting down local agencies and bringing in private enterprise and working on it to make it more efficient to free up revenue and to give people a sense of hope that the system can work for them. and so that's one of the ways that we need to nurture our leaders. we need to be drawing from the same well for too long in terms of the people who are in washington. >> rose: david brooks, is this the center-right country or center-left country? >> to me it's de monitoring center-right country. you can do the polling. ask people where you want to scale 0-0, 0 being conservative 5 is liberal. they see themselves in center-right, suspicious in government but it should be around to give them a helping hand with grants an
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)